Human Pathophysiology and Translational Medicine Graduate Program (HPTM) HPTM Course Descriptions

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Human Pathophysiology and Translational Medicine Course Descriptions

Research (HPTM 6097)

Formal research directed toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree programs. Grading will be based upon the student's level of performance as reported by the student's research supervisor and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory in a Mentor Report. Work is designed to introduce students to the techniques and philosophy of scientific research and to guide them in the development of a research problem in their major area of concentration. At the end of the registered term, students are required to write a one-page description of their research work.

This course is taken after a student has passed the qualifying exam. Each student may enroll in this course for a maximum of three terms before becoming a candidate.

Prerequisites: Approval of Program Advisor
Terms offered: I, II, III
Year offered: Annually
Hours per week: Variable


Thesis (HPTM 6098)

Once admitted to candidacy, it is required for students pursuing a Master of Science or Master of Arts degree to enroll in this course. This course is for the formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the thesis for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree while under the direction of the student’s supervisory committee. The student will pursue the proposed research and present a progress report and/or agreed upon objectives to the mentor and/or supervisory committee for approval and recommendations. Grading will be based upon the student’s level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the student’s supervisory committee and will be assigned as Satisfactory (S), Needs Improvement (N), or Unsatisfactory (U).
Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy
Terms offered: I, II, III
Year Offered: Annually
Hours per week: Variable 3-9

Dissertation (HPTM 6099)

Once admitted to candidacy, it is required for students pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy degree to enroll in this course.  This course is for the formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree while under the direction of the student’s supervisory committee. The student will pursue the proposed research and present a progress report and/or agreed upon objectives to the mentor and/or supervisory committee for approval and recommendations. Grading will be based upon the student's level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the student's supervisory committee and will be assigned as Satisfactory (S), Needs Improvement (N), or Unsatisfactory (U).
Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy
Terms offered: I, II, III
Year Offered: Annually
Hours per week: Variable 3-9

Translational Research Seminar Series for HPTM Graduate Students (HPTM 6109)

This seminar series PROVIDES OPPORTUNITIES FOR Human Pathophysiology and Translational Medicine (HPTM) graduate and Translational Research Track (TRT) medical students to present their research to their peers and interested faculty in a scholastic setting, maintain contact with TRT students and gain an understanding of the translational insights of the medical students doing their clinical rotations, and interface with experienced clinicians and scientific competencies. Grading will be based on: seminar and post-seminar discussion attendance (70%), professionalism (5%), career building (10%) and the annual presentation of a student research update seminar (15%).  Final grades will be calculated based on the standard A-F scale.

Prerequisites: Student must be entering second year in the HPTM program to enroll
Terms offered: I, II
Years offered: Annually
Hours per week: Discussion 1; Seminar 1


Bioventure (HPTM 6211)

A hands-on immersion into life science entrepreneurship through practical lessons that are applied to students' group projects in the course. Students will graduate from this course with practical understanding and experience in how to evaluate a life science technology as a basis for starting a new business. The student/fellow directed course is intended to be an 8 week intensive undertaking, where 4-5 student teams begin with nascent intellectual property, conduct market/IP diligence, identify commercially viable products, create developmental/commercialization/financing plans, culminating into a detailed investor presentation. Each team would be guided by one or two experienced domain-specific entrepreneur(s) for the duration of the course. The goal is to provide students with practical experience in conceptualizing commercial applications for their research, and also provide important skills of how to lead and function within a team, reducing complex biological concepts to simple value propositions.


Practice of Translational Science – Modules I, II, III and IV (HPTM 6291, 6292, 6293, 6294)

6291 MODULE I: PRACTICE OF TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE (2 Credits)

Students in this course will participate in active, student-directed cooperative learning exercises in small groups to explore foundational concepts that address basic competencies of translational scientists.  Students will be concurrently enrolled with medical students in Gross Anatomy and Radiology course (HPTM 6405).  Topics explored during the POTS 1 courses will include scientific knowledge of human physiology and pathology as well as traditional basic sciences such as cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, etc.  Concepts will be linked to Problem Based Learning cases studies in the GAR course (HTPM 6405).  Students will also spend significant time in groups exploring and applying concepts related to other core competencies of translational scientists, such as teaching, professionalism, communication, and management.  Grades will be based on weekly quizzes (20%), final written exam (20%), small group participation and problem-solving (20%), and other (oral presentation, reflective writing, peer assessment, learning portfolio) (40%).

Prerequisites:  Students must be enrolled in the HPTM program.  HPTM 6405 must be taken concurrently.
Terms offered:  I
Years offered:  Annually
Hours per week:  Conference/Discussion 4


6292 MODULE II: PRACTICE OF TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE (2 Credits)

Students in this course will participate in active, student-directed cooperative learning exercises in small groups to explore foundational concepts that address basic competencies of translational scientists.  This course will emphasize core principles in physiology incorporating biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, etc..  Grades will be based on weekly quizzes (20%), final written exam (20%), participation in small group activities (20%), and other ( (oral presentation, reflective writing, peer assessment, learning portfolio) (40%).

Prerequisites:  Students must be enrolled in the HPTM program.  HPTM 6291 and HPTM 6405.  HPTM 6332 must be taken concurrently.
Terms offered:  I
Years offered:  Annually
Hours per week:  Conference/Discussion 4


6293 MODULE 3: PRACTICE OF TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE (2 Credits)

Students in this course will participate in active, student-directed cooperative learning exercises in small groups to explore foundational concepts that address basic competencies of translational scientists.  This course will emphasize core principles in physiology and pathology incorporating cell injury and adaptation, inflammation, immunologic diseases, microbiology, environmental and genetic diseases.  Grades will be based on weekly quizzes (20%), final written exam (20%), participation in small group activities (20%), and other (oral presentation, reflective writing, peer assessment, learning portfolio) (40%).

Prerequisites:  Students must be enrolled in the HPTM program.  HPTM 6405, HPTM 6291, HPTM 6332, HPTM 6292
Terms offered:  II
Years offered:  Annually
Hours per week:  Conference/Discussion 4


6294 MODULE 4: PRACTICE OF TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE (2 Credits)

Students in this course will participate in active, student-directed cooperative learning exercises in small groups to explore foundational concepts that address basic competencies of translational scientists.  This course will emphasize core principles in physiology and pathology, as well as research skills such as grant writing, research techniques, presentation skills, animal use and human subjects.  Grades will be based on:  scientific content assessment (40% of total grade) includes quizzes, exams, and post-class assignments.  Competency assessment is the remaining 60% of the grade.  Competency assessment includes reflective writing, peer assessment, group work exercises, proposal papers, group projects and oral presentations.

Prerequisites:  Students must be enrolled in the HPTM program.  HPTM 6405, HPTM 6291, HPTM 6332, HPTM 6292, POTS3 and Pathobiology and Hose Defenses for HPTM students.
Terms offered:  II
Years offered:  Annually
Hours per week:  Conference/Discussion 4


Introduction to Big Data Visual Analytics (HPTM 6284)

The accelerated growth and complexity of biomedical data far exceeds our cognitive abilities to exploit it for the prevention,  diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. A promising approach to bridge this gap is through the emerging field of visual analytics defined as the “science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces.” This course provides the theoretical foundations and practical methods related to visual analytics focused towards the analysis and comprehension of large and complex biomedical datasets (e.g., genomic data, and electronic health records). The theoretical foundations will focus on the principles related to cognition, computation and graphic design. The practical methods will focus on hands-on experience in using commercial (Tableau and Pajek) and a research prototype (MODIM) requiring no programming. Through a required project, students will have the opportunity to integrate their theoretical and practical knowledge of big data visual analytics to analyze, comprehend and present complex patterns in a large biomedical dataset. Grading scale will be A-F.

Prerequisites:  Biostatistics – BBSC 6222 or Interprofessional Translational Research Design – HPTM 6295, or with the permission of the instructor
Terms offered: Summer, 2nd Block
Years offered: Annually
Hours per week: Conference/Discussion 4


Interprofessional Translational Research Design Course (HPTM 6295)

The Interprofessional Translational Research Design (IPTRD) course will team HPTM students with UTMB Medical Students in the Translational Research Track in identifying a translational problem and designing translational research projects.  The course will focus development of key research design and collaborative competencies.  Major emphasis will be on biostatistics and research design, team building, professional identify development, inter-professional communication and oral presentation skills.  The course will meet for three, two hour sessions weekly.  Teaching methodology will use active learning modalities such as guided inquiry, moderated discussion, workshop sessions and seminar presentations.  Course grades will be based on small group discussions participation, written critiques of research articles, and research proposal developed as an interprofessional pair.

Prerequisites: Currently enrolled in the HPTM program having satisfied the requirements of HPTM 6291, 6292, HPTM 6293 and HPTM 6294 or a UTMB Medical School Student enrolled I the Translational Research Track
Terms offered: III
Year offered: Annually
Hours per week: Lecture 6


Laboratory Rotation and Clinical Encounters (HPTM 6306)

This course will consist of two components:  1) a laboratory rotation with HPTM research faculty, and 2) clinical encounter sessions with HPTM clinical faculty.  During the laboratory rotation, students will gain hands-on experience and mentorship in conducting T1 translational research projects in their specific area of scientific and clinical interest.  The goal of the clinical encounter sessions are to continue the development of interprofessional communication skills between scientist (students) and physicians (clinical mentor), have the student gain a focused knowledge of current standards of diagnosis and treatment of a specific disease or injury, discuss the limitation of current methods of clinical care, and explore or identify potential areas for future translational research projects for the improvement of current standards of care.  Clinical encounter sessions activities will include:  physician “shadowing” to observe patients afflicted with the diseases or injury of interest and attending interdisciplinary clinical conference that discuss disease processes and/or patient care.

Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the HPTM program
Terms offered: I, II, III
Year offered: Annually
Hours per week: Laboratory 12


Gross Anatomy and Radiology (HPTM 6405)

In this course, graduate students in the HPTM curriculum will participate in problem based learning, anatomy lab, and lectures together with selected medical students in the Integrated Medical course of the same name.  This inter-professional learning opportunity will allow medical and graduate students to learn with, from and about each other with the goal of instilling collaborative competencies for translational research.  Grades will be based on participation in small group problem based learning sessions (45%), midterm and final written exams (25%), mid term and final laboratory practical exams (22%), and self study cross sectional anatomy tutorial (8%).

Prerequisites: Enrollment in HPTM
Terms offered: I
Year offered: Annually
Hours per week: Laboratory 6-8; Lecture 4; Conference/Discussion 3


Pathobiology and Host Defense for HPTM Students (HPTM 6406)

In this course, graduate students in the HPTM curriculum will participate in problem-based learning ((PBL) sessions, pathology lab session and lectures together with selected medical students in the integrated Medical Curriculum course of the same name.  PBL and lab sessions involve case-based studies of various diseases.  Major basic science topics include general pathology, histopathology, basic immunology and microbiology.  The inter-professional learning opportunity will allow medical students and graduate students to learn with, from and about each other with the goal of instilling collaborative competencies for translational research.  The course will be complemented by  the HPTM course Practice of Translational Science Module 3.  Grades will be based on mid-term exam, final exam, lab exam, PBL evaluation, PBL graded quizzes and graded weekly quizzes.  Assessment modalities for HPTM students are tailored specific for the program-specific objectives, hence the use of essay examinations in addition to course development multiple choice assessments.

Prerequisites: HPTM 6405, HPTM 6291, HPTM 6332, HPTM 6292.  Students must be enrolled in the HPTM program
Terms offered: II
Year offered: Annually
Hours per week: Lecture 5; Discussion 6; Laboratory 2